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  • Exendin-3 (9-39) amide receptor Among the AXL positive tumor

    2024-06-21

    Among the AXL-positive tumors that we screened, the TNBC cell line MDA-MB-231 showed the highest AXL expression level. Additionally, AXL protein levels were higher in TNBC patient samples than in other breast cancers. Considering the difficulty of, and the urgent need for, effective treatments of TNBC, we concentrated our in vivo studies on a TNBC xenograft model. Consistent with the anti-tumor effect of AXL-CAR-T Exendin-3 (9-39) amide receptor in vitro, we revealed for the first time that AXL-CAR-T cells provided significant growth inhibition of MDA-MB-231 tumors in vivo. CAR-T cell therapy has not achieved the same achievements in solid tumors as it has in hematologic malignancies. One of the reasons for this is the immunosuppressive microenvironment inside tumors. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) that are present within the tumor microenvironment heavily suppress surveilling immune cells and can secrete TGF-β, PGE2, reactive oxygen species, and arginase [46] that inhibit the effect of CAR-T cells. Additionally, TAMs can also produce high levels of Programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PDL1) that inhibit CAR-T cells by binding with the programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1) of CAR-T cells. It has been confirmed in NSCLC and breast cancer models that the AXL antibody YW327.6S2 not only inhibits tumor growth but also inhibits the release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines from TAMs [41]. Therefore, AXL-CAR-T cell therapy may not only inhibit tumor growth but also be able to overcome suppression in the hostile tumor microenvironment. This makes the specific AXL-CAR-T cell treatment a more promising therapy for solid tumors.
    Conclusion
    Acknowledgments This work was supported by The National Key Research and Development Program of China (no. 2017YFA0105303).
    Introduction Ovarian cancer (OC) is the leading cause of gynecologic cancer-related deaths for women in the United States and throughout the world. High-grade serous OC accounts for 70% of the OC cases and is associated with poor patient survival and clinical prognosis, and 5-year survival rate is about 29%–50%. Surgery followed by chemotherapy is the principal treatment strategy for high-grade serous OC. Although initial response to chemotherapy is high, most patients develop resistance and relapse. In addition to adverse and toxic effects, chemotherapy can cause complications related to intraperitoneal catheters.4, 5, 6 Therefore, new treatment approaches are urgently needed to improve patient survival. Tyrosine kinases are major targets for therapies because of their roles in the modulation of growth factor signaling and tumor metastasis.7, 8, 9 The receptor tyrosine kinase AXL has been characterized as oncogenic because of its promotion of cancer cell survival, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis.10, 11, 12 AXL knockdown was also shown to inhibit angiogenesis by impairing endothelial tube formation. Upregulation of AXL expression has been reported in many cancers, including OC and cancers of the lung, prostate, breast, and pancreas.10, 11, 14, 15, 16 AXL has been well identified as a therapeutic target in OC.17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22 Rankin and colleagues showed that AXL is highly expressed in high-grade serous and metastatic ovarian tumors, but not in normal ovarian epithelium or tumor stroma. Given the role of AXL as a prognostic marker for OC, inhibition of AXL in ovarian tumors holds a great therapeutic potential to render/slow cancer progression. AXL inhibitors have been shown to inhibit oncogenic downstream signaling pathways, and they offer great therapeutic efficacy and sensitivity,24, 25 suggesting that inhibition of AXL is indeed an attractive strategy for OC patients. Several therapeutic approaches, including antibodies and small molecule inhibitors, have been used. Although targeted therapies have good toxicity profiles, it has been reported that patients who were treated with small molecular inhibitors, such as anti-EGFR, anti Her-2, and antiangiogeneic agents, developed severe toxicities. The other targeted therapies, non-coding RNAs and aptamers, are emerging alternatives with potentially less toxic effects than current standard therapies.22, 27, 28, 29, 30